Orderly

 

        

 
This is what I had the privilege of seeing this week.

I like including the tractor (and its driver)—
reminders of where this order comes from
long before we see the orderly rows of produce
—fruits and vegetables—in our supermarkets
on shelves and in long aisles.

In response to Daily Prompt: orderly.

 

 

 

Watermelon Geometry

Geometric Abstraction


Architecture—its endless opportunities to see and see again— i
ts possibilities for finding and framing an abstract!


What’s to see in a mere line, mere wall,  mere angle?
If one looks long enough, nothing is “mere”.

 

During  National Poetry Writing Monthwhile writing poetry, I have also been thinking what else might be considered poetry and poetic. I have also been reading authors’ diverse ways of expressing and experiencing the sacred. People most often turn to nature for a sense of both the poetic and the sacred.

It can be found in other ways, too—even, for some, in mathematics and geometry, or in architecture and engineering such as one sees in remarkable bridges. Bridges?  You may say humorously (or not, if you have bridge phobia), “Yes, when crossing a bridge, the higher it is, the more sacredness I sense . . . about my own life!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time

Grass and Redwood

Tough and Tender

Stark swirl—
tornado’s
tantrum
tears
through

wild

landscape

—no escape—

as tough           and tender             alike,

                             s c a t t e r.
.

 

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In response to a three word prompt: tantrum, tear, tender. 

A drought-themed variation on this will post soon (for  the “Waiting for Rain” series).

 
 

Wonder Swirl

Oh Maps, it’s not your fault
how people fight over you—
how they contest your lines—
your names!

Our planet is not
the color-quilted globe
of childhood.

Visible by spaceship
it’s a wonder-swirl
of water, wind, cloud, and land
gloriously undisputed.

 

 

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A poem from a collection-in-process called Maps.

Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo and National Poetry Writing Month.

 

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Beauty

Waiting for the blue moon.
Lacy clouds conceal its rise.
Then, laying aside
my set expectations,
I see, I see, I see.

 

 

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Poem “based on a true experience”.  After feeling disappointed by clouds not allowing me to get a clear photograph of the moon, I then noticed them—beautifully backlit—and wrote this poem with a wider, deeper consideration—how letting go of (or shifting) expectations can turn initial disappointment into a pleasant surprise.  

Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo and National Poetry Writing Month.

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World Map

My first world map,
in a coloring book
open to imagination

at national lines,
no soldiers or border guards,
just Crayolas lined up on the table

while other children worldwide
looked for their country
and favorite color

innocent of differences
beyond crayon,
only sensing we could play together
if we met someday.

 

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From a collection  of poetry called Maps, appearing at this time only here.

A response to: earth.

Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo and National Poetry Writing Month.

 

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Time’s Release

Perception

Mortal


Trees look self-sufficient—
immortal—
yet leaves, in a curling
grasp of want and wait
reach and fall.

A tree slumps
leafless
mid-summer.

Drought reminds,
we forget.
Our thirst
easily quenched.

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Poems in the series “Waiting for Rain” are still in process, now appearing only here on this blog. (more…)

Rain Dance

Opaque skies listen
to nimble, wistful wind,
a marimba in the woods,
graceful grasses swaying,
a melancholy rain dance.

 

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Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo and National Poetry Writing Month.

Written in response to a three word prompt: melancholy, nimble, opaque.

Poems in the series “Waiting for Rain” are still in process, now appearing only here on this blog.


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Dissonant

Lift

Hope on the Line

 

Hoping for rain
is like stream fishing—
wading into hip-deep water,
flicking a wide arc through the air

tipped with  hope on the hook
and in the line tied to it—
the one you reel in,
even without a catch.

“It got away?”

You know better,
waiting with net and umbrella.


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Poems in the series “Waiting for Rain” are still in process, now appearing only here on this blog. (more…)

Lightning

Ideas in process

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Where do ideas  come from? 

Ideas that contribute to artistic works will come from various directions and countless experiences, thoughts and feelings; yet, patterns may tie them together. Connections may be subtle, ambiguous, complex or simple, in a way we may not initially realize.  For example, during one period of writing, I was quite surprised to find how often my poems related thematically to drought or rain. 

Where do ideas go? 

Ideas can disappear as unwritten inspirations, or remain as if they were never written—forgotten in notebooks, slips of paper or hard drives. (more…)

What is

Nostalgia

 

Nostalgia hovers like mist
over landlocked lake.

It flutters like flight-fragile wings
of migrating monarchs.

It settles like morning dew
on drought-crusted branches.

It lingers like condensation
on cold glass—w
indow and mirror.


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Poem 13: during National Poetry Writing Month.

 

Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo.


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Maps

 

Future—
oh, the maps that get us there,
through turns unmarked.

One map says “adventure”,
another says “security”,
one says “hope”,
another one “destiny”.

It may be said it’s written in the stars,
but who can read the language of skies
that realign words like clues
on a crossword puzzle’s line?

Map the sky, but it’s moving,
map your life, it is changing,
your future, it will surprise you.

You’ll be navigating an uncharted wave,
so let yourself be called “explorer”,
let yourself be called “the brave”.

Accept both stars and oceans deep
and yourself for still standing
when even gravity seems to toss
but you never doubt your landing.

 


            .

From a collection  of poetry called Maps, appearing at this time only here.

 

Poem 11: during National Poetry Writing Month.

Considering future.

 

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Joining those writing a poem a day during NaPoWriMo. 

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